Programme

This page provides details of presentations and other programming. For more information about presenters, please visit the Speakers page.


Conference Outline

Wednesday, December 8, 2021Thursday, December 9, 2021Friday, December 10, 2021

09:00–12:00: Plenary Session

12:00–13:15: Lunch Break

13:15–14:45: Plenary Session

14:45–15:00: Break

15:00–16:30: Plenary Session

09:00–10:30: Parallel Sessions

10:30–10:45: Break

10:45–12:15: Parallel Sessions

12:15–13:15: Lunch Break

13:15–14:45: Parallel Sessions

14:45–15:00: Break

15:00–16:30: Parallel Sessions

16:30–17:00: Break

17:00–18:00: Parallel Sessions

09:00–10:30: Parallel Sessions

10:30–10:45: Break

10:45–12:15: Parallel Sessions

12:15–13:15: Lunch Break

13:15–14:45: Parallel Sessions

14:45–15:00: Break

15:00–16:30: Parallel Sessions

16:30–17:00: Break

17:00–18:00: Closing Session

The draft version of the Conference Programme will be available online on November 16, 2021. All registered delegates will be notified of this publication by email.

*Please be aware that the above schedule may be subject to change.


Featured Presentations

  • Rethinking Classical Reception: Can We Still Learn Something From Antiquity in a Postcolonial World?
    Rethinking Classical Reception: Can We Still Learn Something From Antiquity in a Postcolonial World?
    Keynote Presentation: Montserrat Camps-Gaset
  • Brexit, Borders and the Gibraltarian Voice: a Conversation With M.G.Sanchez
    Brexit, Borders and the Gibraltarian Voice: a Conversation With M.G.Sanchez
    Featured Interview: M.G.Sanchez & Isabel Alonso

Conference Programme

The draft version of the Conference Programme will be available online on November 16, 2021. All registered delegates will be notified of this publication by email.

*Please be aware that the above schedule may be subject to change.


Previous Programming

View details of programming for past BCE conferences via the links below.

Rethinking Classical Reception: Can We Still Learn Something From Antiquity in a Postcolonial World?
Keynote Presentation: Montserrat Camps-Gaset

Over the last few years, academic voices have risen, mainly in English speaking countries, against the reception of the Classics (Greek and Latin languages, literatures and civilization), arguing that the Classics have helped to shape the model of white male supremacy in the West. Looking at Antiquity from a critical anthropological perspective is nothing new and it has already been established that the study of the Ancient Mediterranean must be framed in its proper social context, but new issues about the usefulness of Classical Greek and Latin have been brought forward. The aim of this paper is, on the one hand, to stress the difference between an anthropological approach to the Classics as a part of the past and the way the Classics have been taught and conveyed, that is, “received”, in a traditional western discourse; and on the other, to show that criticism from modern perspectives such as postcolonial and feminist studies is imperative while at the same time show that the Latin and Greek languages can still provide tools to develop critical thinking towards the past but also towards our own position in the Modern World.

Read presenter's biography
Brexit, Borders and the Gibraltarian Voice: a Conversation With M.G.Sanchez
Featured Interview: M.G.Sanchez & Isabel Alonso

In this session Dr Isabel Alonso Breto of the University of Barcelona will be chatting with M. G. Sanchez, Gibraltar’s most well-known novelist. Sanchez – who holds a PhD in English Literature from the University of Leeds – is the author of fourteen books with a Gibraltar theme, including six novels (The Escape Artist, Solitude House, Jonathan Gallardo, Diary of a Victorian Colonial, The Fetishist and Gooseman) and three autobiographical memoirs (Past, Bombay Journal and Border Control). Alonso and Sanchez will be discussing borders, Brexit and narrative voices in The Fetishist, the author’s latest novel (due to be published in October 2021), as well as looking at some of the broader challenges and obstacles faced by writers coming from contested micro-territories.

Read presenter's biography
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